Horses Can Help You Become a Better Human Being

For at least 5,000 years, humans and horses have interacted. Food, medical assistance, and protection from predators and the elements were all provided to the horses as a benefit from these connection.  However, it is highly probable that the primary goal of these relationships was to help humans — food, transportation, and military advantage. Interacting with horses has been much more broadly recognized in recent years.
Here are some good things which you will gain from horses.

Positivity

Horses, like humans, react to positive reinforcement far better than punishment. Horses may be readily trained through positive reinforcement. Food incentives, like as carrots and apples, are ideal, but a massage or scratch will also work well. Horses groom each other on their necks, backs, and withers in this manner (the part of their body where their neck meets their shoulders and where we measure their height).

Positive reinforcement training entails focusing on the positive aspects of a situation while ignoring the negative aspects.

Feeling good

Being around horses can improve one’s mood, which is one of the reasons why they are frequently used during therapy for persons suffering from stress or trauma. Humans may release oxytocin, a hormone that aids in social bonding and relaxation, by touching animals. Because horses are so large, petting them is not the same as caressing a cat or a dog. Because horses may be intimidating, some individuals find that riding or even petting them gives them a boost in confidence. Being able to control how and where a horse moves may boost one’s self-confidence.

At the same time, if you are physically large and noisy, you should consider how this affects other people and animals.

Horses can also assist with this. Horses are prey, while people are predators, from an evolutionary standpoint. Even when we don’t mean to or don’t feel that way, we might come off as aggressive and scary to horses (or other humans).

Communication skills

When we’re with an animal, we have to learn to communicate in ways that aren’t the same as  with  humans. Horses can be trained to respond to vocal orders, but this is not the same as having a conversation with them. Even so, you may communicate with horses through body language. Horses have excellent nonverbal communication skills. As previously said, ‘conversations’ with horses need concentration, focus, and self-awareness. Humans must learn to interpret horses’ body language in order to comprehend how they are feeling at any given moment.

Imagining the world through the eyes of a horse can help us develop empathy for others and the capacity to see things from diverse perspectives.

When we’re with an animal, we have to learn to communicate in ways that aren’t the same as  with  humans. Horses can be trained to respond to vocal orders, but this is not the same as having a conversation with them. Even so, you may communicate with horses through body language. Horses have excellent nonverbal communication skills. As previously said, ‘conversations’ with horses need concentration, focus, and self-awareness. Humans must learn to interpret horses’ body language in order to comprehend how they are feeling at any given moment.

Imagining the world through the eyes of a horse can help us develop empathy for others and the capacity to see things from diverse perspectives.

Ears back, head high, fast breathing, foot stomping, tight lips/chin, and tail swishing are common indicators of irritation in horses. These are the warning indications that you should proceed with caution. Ears forward, licking and chewing, a lowered head, long blowing breaths, a relaxed lips and chin, and’soft eyes’ are all signals of calm, indicating that the horse is relaxed and safe to approach while you have their attention. It’s a little more difficult to discern if a horse is in discomfort. In order to avoid attracting a predator, prey animals conceal their suffering. This is why scientists created a particular chart of the equine pain face to aid horse owners in recognizing whether their animal is wounded or unwell.

Physical Activity

Horseback riding is a terrific way to get some exercise. This was demonstrated using a MET score, which is a metric for determining the intensity of various activities. The MET stands for Metabolic Equivalent Task, and one MET represents the rate at which calories are burned when sitting. 5.5 METs has been computed for horseback riding. This places it in the moderately strenuous physical activity category (within the range of 3 to 6 METs).

You don’t have to ride horses to get the physical benefits. Grooming, saddling, cleaning stables and yards, carrying feed bags, and leading horses to and from their paddocks are all part of caring for horses. The MET score for these sports is 4.3, which is the same as archery or strolling around a golf course with clubs.
So we know that horseback riding and horse care may help you stay active and fit, but there are other advantages that you may not have considered.