77 years-old Ukrainian woman puts her life on the line to save almost 700 animals

Even though many individuals left their dogs as they in Ukraine, other heroes decided to stay and  help the animals who are in need. Instead of escaping from Ukraine, Asya Serpinska,  marched into it. She was prepared to risk her life since her animal refuge in Hostomel, a town north of Kyiv, required her assistance.

When the situation in Ukraine has started, Serpinska’s sanctuary had roughly 600 dogs and 100 cats. She also decided to take in a number of zoo animals that had been left. S he was also repeatedly warned by Russian forces to leave the territory. But she always stayed firm and tried to do everything she could to help animals.

It wasn’t long until Russian soldiers surrounded Hostomel on all sides, but Serpinska didn’t let panic overcome her. Serpinska dashed to the sanctuary, opening the kennels so the dogs and cats would not be stuck inside. During the sh.e.l.lin.g, she and a few members of staff stayed at the bunker.

“The first thing that came to me was that I needed to get to the refuge right now,” Serpinska explained. “I made a conscious decision to go there even though I realized that it wasn’t safe for my life.” My family was present, as were my pets.”

Knowing the threat that surrounded the sanctuary, the volunteers continued to care for the animals. They kept feeding them and clean the area at regular intervals. Serpinska’s friends pleaded with her to depart Ukraine, but she denied since she couldn’t leave her dogs behind.

Serpinska observed a neighboring  zoo go up in smoke while defending her refuge. The zoo’s owners had left the creatures to survive for themselves. Serpinska and her colleagues faced the fire to save as many creatures as they could, including peacocks and turtles. Serpinska’s squad was unable to take the lion with them because it was the only one who survived.

Serpinska explained, “Only the lion was left behind.” “We would want to go there through she.l.l.i.ng for five weeks to nurse the lion since he had been kept in a kennel and we didn’t have the keys to free her,” says the narrator.

Serpinska had to talk with the Russian soldiers when they planted a mi.n.e close to the lion’s cage, preventing the poor beast from being kil.le.d. The m.i.n.e was destroyed by the military, but the lion escaped. Until Ukrainian forces recovered the region, the shelter volunteers continued to feed the cat.

Although the Ukrainians have retaken Hostomel, the shelter personnel encountered several dangerous scenarios while Russian soldiers were present. Serpinska’s dog, Gina, was unfortunately k.iied . Serpinska was devastated, but she refused to allow her grief prevent her from assisting the other animals.

After then, soldiers came to the refuge multiple times, and Serpinska was lucky to survive each episode. The Russians once imprisoned everyone in the bunker. They were warned that if they opened the door, it wouldn’t be good for them.

After they were freed, they found there had most likely been no m.i.n.e. near the door after all. That was merely something the soldier shouted to frighten them. Although woman was afraid from time to time, s he never went away, though, because she was needed by the animal creatures.

At this moment Hostomel is quiet.  The majority of the town residents has left it, and many of the structures have been destroyed. Serpinska is attempting to restore the shelter, which is also in bad shape and without power. Now that the village is more available than before, she’s already working hard to collect money and find place for the animals.

“It makes no difference who you defend: children, humans, animals, or the environment. “Responsibility is the most major factor,” Serpinska stated. “Rescue animals in order to keep them human.”

Despite everything, the creatures in the shelter appear to be content. Serpinska and her colleagues have gone as far to ensure that everyone is protected. More kind individuals like them are needed in the world.