Rare Footage Of A Sea Angel Swimming Under The Ice Captured (video)

There are two sections of the cosmos that are largely undiscovered. The first is, of course, deep space, which can never be fully explored. The deep ocean, on the other hand, represents the second frontier of discovery right here on Earth. Despite the fact that many explorers have gone deep into the ocean several times, it remains one of the most unknown areas for humanity.

The Pacific Ocean, which covers up to one-third of the Earth’s surface, is the biggest body of water, accounting for more than 70% of the planet’s surface. It is believed that if all of the seas were combined into one, the volume would be 0.3 billion cubic miles (1.33 billion cubic kilometers). The deep ocean’s average depth is more than 12,000 feet (more than 3.6000 meters). Only 5% of the ocean’s total surface area has been investigated, and only 5% of the bottom has been topographically scanned. The remaining 95 percent of the ocean will be investigated in the future.

Don Walsh was one of the first deep sea explorers, along with Jacques Piccard, who reached the deepest point in the ocean in 1960. He dived to a depth of 35,814 feet (10,916 meters) in the Mariana Trench, the deepest point in the world’s seas, approximately 200 miles southwest of Guam in the Pacific. On March 26, 2012, director James Cameron ventured even further into the Mariana Trench, reaching a depth of 35,787 feet (10,908 meters). The director, who is best known for films like The Titanic and Avatar, descended nearly 7 miles below Mariana Tench in a specially constructed submarine.


videosource:youtubenationalgeographic

Victor Vescovo swam the deepest a person has ever gone underwater in May of 2019. In a submersible named the DSV Limiting Factor, he sank to 35,835 feet (10,927 meters). Vescovo spent 3.5-4 hours to reach this record-breaking depth, and what he discovered there was incredible. He discovered plastic garbage on the ocean floor, demonstrating that humanity’s pollution may reach any location.

There are still many undiscovered sections of the ocean, as well as unknown ocean and marine species that reside there. The deep ocean’s mysteries are waiting to be discovered, and maybe this will happen soon.

videosource:youtubebbcnews

Alexander Semenov is an underwater photographer and marine scientist. Alex is a daredevil who loves to dive and explore the ocean/sea as the leader of the diver’s team at Moscow State University’s White Sea Biological Station. He expects to uncover something new every time he dives into the deep ocean or sea. For almost ten years, Alex has worked as a professional underwater photographer. He specializes in macrophotography in natural settings for scientific purposes.