When a mother elephant is reunited with her baby after three years apart, she is overcome with emotion

Based on a heartwarming video of an Asian elephant reuniting with its mom after years apart, the old saying that an elephant never forgets appears to be true.

Me-Bai, the tiny elephant, can be seen cuddling its mother, Mae Yui, after a 62-mile (100-kilometer) walk through the Thai forest. In the Elephant Nature Park refuge in the country’s north, the couple enthusiastically claps their ears and massages each other with their trunks at the same time.

When Me-Bai was three and a half years old, she was sold to carry tourists in Thailand and did not see her mom, who also serves in the trade.

It’s terrible since females prefer to keep together in groups until de.a.th, sharing strong bonds. They seldom separate before the calf reaches the age of five.

According to Elephant News, the small elephant departed the travel industry “because she [Me-Bai] was too immature and started to lose weight and couldn’t anymore carry visitors.”

Me-Bai was recently found and brought back to the refuge after being lost for four days and traveling 62 miles in the heat.

When she was three years old, the young elephant was sold to offer rides for tourists in Thailand, and she didn’t see her mom, who was also engaged in the trade, for three years. They are shown here together.

“When Me-Bai initially came to the refuge, she was quite anxious and cautious of everyone, but she soon learned that her new carers had no intention of hurting her in any manner,” the sanctuary noted.

She was initially suspicious of people, but rapidly acclimated to her new environment, according to National Geographic.

The workers are aware that Me-Mae Bai’s works in the local tourism business, and that the owner has decided to retire Mae Yui so that she can join her calf on the reserve.

The couple’s heartwarming reunion was captured on video.

It shows the elephants touching each other with their trunks and rubbing their ears, apparently joyful, after spending half an hour at the place of care-givers together, even if they may be concerned about being separated again.

Mahidol University in Thailand and Emory University in the United States formerly conducted research in the park. They discovered that elephants relieve tension by gently shouting and touching each other’s heads.

These acts are depicted in the video.

Preston Foerder, an elephant behaviorist at the University of Tennessee, thinks that elephants communicate through touch, sound, and sight because their trunks are so sensitive.

In the video below, the couple can be seen walking and eating contentedly together.

Me-Bai, the young calf, can be seen snuggling with her mother, Mae Yui, and gleefully waving her ears in the Elephant Nature Park refuge in the country’s north after a 62-mile (100km) voyage through the Thai forest.

But Frans de Waal, an expert on animal behavior at Emory University, thinks that elephants only remember good relationships.

“There is no question about elephant emotions and attachments,” he continued, “but we humans tend to read mother-daughter relationships onto this.”

“The two may miss each other, but the footage does not always demonstrate this.”

“Now, the owners of Mae Yui and Elephant Nature Park are cooperating with each other to rehabilitate Mae Yui and Me-Bai so they can go to the wild and live in freedom,” the sanctuary added.